THIRD i PARADIGM

Resilience. Stabilization. Performance.

Innovative approaches to mitigate conflict and violent extremism,
strengthen resilience and heal trauma in a chaotic world.

  • You already have the precious mixture that will make you well.

    Rumi
  • Small positive actions every day will add up to large changes over time, as you gradually build new neural structures.

    Rick Hanson, Ph.D. and Richard Mendius, M.D.
    Buddha’s Brain
  • Practicing mindfulness calms down the sympathetic nervous system, so that you are less likely to be thrown into fight or flight.

    Bessel Van Der Kolk, M.D.
    The Body Keeps the Score
  • The fundamental issue in resolving traumatic stress is to restore the proper balance between the rational and emotional brains, so that you can feel in charge of how you respond and how you conduct your life.

    Bessel Van Der Kolk, M.D.
    The Body Keeps the Score
  • After trauma the world is experienced with a different nervous system. The survivor’s energy now becomes focused on suppressing inner chaos, at the expense of spontaneous involvement in their life.

    Bessel Van Der Kolk, M.D.
    The Body Keeps the Score
  • The most powerful way to use the mind-body connection to improve your physical and mental health is through guiding your autonomic nervous system (ANS). Every time you calm the ANS through stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), you tilt the body, brain, and mind increasingly toward inner peace and well-being. You can activate the PNS in many ways including relaxation, big exhalations, mindfulness of the body, imagery, balancing your heartbeat and meditation.

    Rick Hanson, Ph.D. and Richard Mendius, M.D.
    Buddha’s Brain
  • We live in a “get set” world and an increasing body of research suggests that our hyper-vigilant lifestyle is severely impacting the health of our bodies.  …the stresses in our bodies are not released from the pressures generated by our chronic fears and concerns.  Between 75 and 90 percent of primary care physician visits have stress as a major contributing factor.

    Bruce Liption, Ph.D.
    The Biology of Belief